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EDF to power ubitricity EV charging network

Image: Ubitricity.

Image: Ubitricity.

EDF has been chosen by ubitricity to power its UK-wide electric vehicle (EV) charging network with 100% renewable power.

On-street EV charging provider ubitricity has turned to EDF to power all 1,800 publicly-accessible charge points in the UK, the significant majority of which are operational in the capital.

Ubitricity has laid claim to possessing a more than 50% share of the EV charging market in ten urban local authorities, including some central London boroughs such as Westminster. It's points are integrated into lamp posts and bollards, allowing EV owners without access to parking spaces to charge while parked on-street.

Daniel Bentham, managing director at ubitricity, said the partnership with EDF would help the firm realise its ambition of empowering consumers to play a role in helping the UK meet its climate targets.

With a “typical” capacity of 5.5kW, ubitricity has a total network capacity of 9.9MW. EDF’s intent to supply these chargers forms a part of the French utility’s bid to become a major player in the EV space.

Late last year, Current± Hub preferred supplier EDF set out its intent to dominate Europe’s e-mobility sector by 2022, and has since amassed an array of investments, acquisitions and partnerships, ans is also being linked with the purchase of UK charging infrastructure provider Pod Point.

Philippe Commaret, deputy MD for customers at EDF Energy, added; “Home charging of electric vehicles has long been the preserve of people who own a house with a driveway to park and charge their car, creating a barrier to EVs for anyone living in a flat or without off-street parking.

“We want to make sure everyone is welcome to the electric vehicle revolution and ubitricity’s offer opens up new opportunities for low-carbon transport to drivers in cities across the UK.”

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