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Vattenfall and Eliq join together for energy monitoring trial

Image: Eliq

Image: Eliq

Utility giant Vattenfall and energy monitoring company Eliq have launched a new trial in Gustavsberg, Sweden, to increase consumer engagement to optimise the potential of district heating.

Eliq have developed an app that will provide customers with a personal interface that monitors their energy usage. In the trial it will be used to monitor the district heating network and show consumers their usage. It will have smart scheduling functionality allowing consumers to optimise the system. Additionally, a demand-response program will run in the background.

Each of the homes in the trial will also be given a connected radiator valve provided by heating analytics partner QuantCo and Cosa.

Ulrika Jardfelt, VP, BU heat at Vattenfall said: “Vattenfall and Eliq as partners are creating a digitised, personal and user-friendly customer experience that we are testing together with our district heating customers in Gustavsberg. Together we can help our customers manage their consumption in an easier way and live fossil-free within a generation.”

It's hoped that increased engagement can help reduce the emissions produced by systems like district heating, said Joakim Botha, founder and head of sales at Eliq.

“People who live in a centrally heated building don’t understand that their behaviour can help improving network efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions.”

Eliq’s monitoring software is also being incorporated into Bristol Energy’s app, taking data from smart meters and using a self-learning algorithm to help consumers better manage their energy use.

Vattenfall is involved in a number of trials and research projects in the UK and it was last week unveiled as one of the partners in a trial to use Virgin Media's infrastructurefor on-street electric vehicle charging.

In March, it acquired Dutch energy software start-up Senfal in a move into the C&I demand side response market.

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