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Building regulation changes to see 30% reduction in carbon emissions of new build homes

Heat pumps, such as this Daikin heat pump, are capable of reducing the carbon emissions of houses alongside other technologies. Image: Daikin.

Heat pumps, such as this Daikin heat pump, are capable of reducing the carbon emissions of houses alongside other technologies. Image: Daikin.

Heat pumps and solar thermal are among technologies suggested by the government to help meet new carbon reduction goals.

Under the new regulations, announced by the government yesterday (15 December), CO2 emissions from new build homes from 15 June 2022 must be around 30% lower than current standards and emissions from other new buildings, including offices and shops, must be reduced by 27%.

“Installing low carbon technology, such as solar panels and heat pumps, and using materials in a more energy efficient way to keep in heat will help cut emissions – lowering the cost of energy bills for families and helping deliver the UK’s climate change ambitions,” the government said in its announcement.

Alongside this, all new residential buildings, including homes, care homes, student accommodation and children’s homes, must also be designed to reduce overheating.

The changes follow a public consultation, with the government stating they will pave the way for the Future Homes and Buildings Standard in 2025.

The Future Homes Standard is to see carbon emissions reductions in new builds through a mix of fabrics standards and carbon-saving technology, with the government stating in January that it anticipates "that heat pumps will become the primary heating technology for new homes".

"The government is doing everything it can to deliver net zero and slashing CO2 emissions from homes and buildings is vital to achieving this commitment," housing minister Eddie Hughes said about the new changes.

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